Tag Archives: writers

Creating an Anti-Hero – From The Maltese Tiger blog

Author Don Massenzio

Creating an Anti-Hero

This week I want to talk about anti-heroes.

In this morally ambiguous time, it’s no longer popular to write about classic heroes who are purely good and righteous. I mean, where’s the fun in that? Gone are the days of swashbucklers like Ivanhoe and Robin Hood. Even the most recent incarnation of Superman has a gritty, brooding veneer.

However, you may be wondering…

What is an anti-hero?

An anti-hero is a protagonist who is flawed, but in a way that the reader can still sympathize with the character.

There are plenty of examples from modern fiction like Wolverine of the X-Men or John McClane in Die Hard. But anti-heroes are nothing new.

The classics are chock-full of anti-heroes like Scarlett O’Hara and Philip Marlowe. Even Shakespeare wrote intriguing anti-heroes like Othello and Hamlet.

So, you’re probably asking, “How do 

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The Return of Smorgasbord Open House – Interviews for all writers and other creative artists.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

The Open Houseseries ran from January 2016 for four months and was one of the most popular of the interview series.  I thought that we might revisit the theme for 2018.

This series will be joined in the next few weeks by an additional author interview which will be in audio and more details on that shortly.

Would you like to be interviewed?

It is open to writers across blogging, books, poetry as well as artists, musicians and photographers.

It is an opportunity to showcase your work from blog posts to sunsets on Smorgasbord and my social media platforms.

I also want it to showcase the person you are and discover more about what makes them tick, their inspirations and also some fun facts.

I have decided to retain the title of the series as Smorgasbord Open House. If you were interviewed two years ago that is not a…

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“Secret Writing Rules” and Why to Ignore Them…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Anne R. Allen

Somerset Maugham famously said, “There are three rules for writing. Unfortunately, nobody knows what they are.”

But pretty much everybody you meet in the publishing business will give you a list of them. (One is “never start a sentence with ‘there are’” —so watch yourself, Mr. Maugham.)

Some of the rules show up in any standard writing book or class, but others only seem to get circulated in critique groups, conference workshops, and forums.

They’re a secret to everybody else.

But you’ll run into them sooner or later. In a forum or workshop, somebody will tell you with schoolmarmish assurance that you MUST follow these secret writing rules to be a successful novelist.

Nobody knows exactly where these rules come from, or why so many great books have become classics without following a single one.

Don’t get me wrong: many “secret writing rules” involve useful tips…

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5 Tips For Successful Proofreading

K.M. Allan

For someone who is a writer, I’ve done very little of it lately. This is because I’ve been spending the last few months editing and proofreading the four books that make up my YA supernatural series. As a result, I’ve become pretty apt at revising drafts, or at least I’ve learned enough about proofreading to share some valuable tips.

Make A List

Before you start proofreading, you should have a list of what you want to tackle; such as…

  • Spelling
  • Grammar
  • Punctuation
  • Physical Character Descriptions (eye color, hair color, tall, short, etc.)
  • Settings/Locations
  • Dialogue

Make a basic list of common proofing goals (like those above), as well as a list of things to check that are specific to your book. No one knows better than you which words or phrases you repeat, or that Timmy fell down the well in chapter three so he can’t be at school in chapter…

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EDITING 101: A series of 64 FREE Editing Tips – INDEX – For your future reference…

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Different Types of Closure

Legends of Windemere

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I’ve said in previous posts that one of the most important parts of concluding a series is creating closure. You need to bring things to an end, which isn’t as easy as some people think.  In fact, one of the reasons it can be so tough is because you have a variety of closure types to choose from.  It depends a lot on what you’re going for, but even planning doesn’t alleviate all the pressure.  So, what are the types?

  1. Classic Good Ending– All of the good guys get what they wanted and all of the bad guys got what they deserved.  It’s the oldest type of closure in the book.  Nothing messy and no risk of people feeling it’s a downer.  Though, you might get called out for being weak and unoriginal.
  2. Classic Bad Ending– I’m not sure how long it took for someone…

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Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update – Malia Ann Haberman, David Lawlor and Geoff Le Pard

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the Friday edition of the Cafe and Bookstore Update. The first author with a recent review is Malia Ann Haberman for her book Letters from an American Soldier: A True Love Story told through real Love Letters. The letters were written by Malia Ann’s father who was fighting in the Korean War to her mother..

About the book

These AMAZING love letters will take you inside the mind, heart, and soul of an American Soldier while he’s training then fighting overseas in the Korean War. They’re real, and personal, and heartbreaking, and heartwarming. They’re filled with deep, raw emotions that are hard to replicate in fiction. They show how war can change a person.
These letters really are incredibly awesome. Grab a copy and give it a read. I promise, you won’t be sorry.

One of the recent reviews for the book

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