Tag Archives: characters

Make Characters Unique with Layering – by Jami Gold…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Somewhere along our learning curve as writers, we’re likely to come across the skill of layering. But what does that mean?

Often that skill refers to how we layer in different elements of our story, weaving in our plot, characters, settings, emotions, etc. In fact, some writers even start with just one element—such as writing their whole story just as dialogue—and then layer in everything else once they have the shape of the story.

But today, I want to talk more about layering that focuses on characters. Specifically, I want to dig into how layering can help us create unique characters, no matter how stereotypical or tropey they might be on the surface.

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Make Your Characters Flawsome

A Writer's Path

by S.E. White

As in: flawed, yet awesome. No one wants to read boring perfection.

I’ll list my top two favorite female literary characters, straight off the top of my head, to start making my point:

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How to Balance Character and Action – by Julie Hyzy…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on K.D. Dowdall Blog:

Characters, whether sympathetic or despicable, are the fuel that keep a plot moving. I’m sure you’ve heard many writers—whether plotters or pantsers—compare writing a novel to taking a trip.

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How to make writing in first-person easier

Jean's Writing

Do you struggle with first-person narratives?

I do. Even though it’s my favorite point of view.

I love writing, and reading, first-person point of view stories. But getting it right can be a struggle. I was thrilled to read a recent post on writing techniques from Bookfox

Writing in First Person: 4 Tricks and 6 Pitfalls

The article breaks down the simple do’s and don’ts that make writing in first-person simpler and easier. And reminded me, there are some wonderful, famous authors who wrote in first-person. In addition to thousands of classic works of literature. Selecting first-person POV need not be a hindrance to good writing.

How these writing techniques clicked for me.

  • To find a character’s voice, give them attitude.
  • Do not let the narrator be dull. Don’t want to put your reader to sleep.
  • Showcase your character’s blind spot. We all have them and so should a…

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15 Ways to Make Your Characters Suffer (for the Good of Your Novel) – by Ali Luke…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Aliventures site:

Do your characters suffer enough?

Even if you’re writing a light and fluffy romance, at some point, someone in your novel is going to need to get hurt.

I’m not suggesting all-out graphic torture here, obviously – unless that suits your genre. Suffering comes in a lot of different forms – and I’m going to go through a bunch of those in a moment.

In general, making characters suffer should do at least one, ideally both, of these:

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Dynamic Character: How to write a compelling protagonist – from Reedsy…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

A common criticism of fiction — be it in film, television, or novels — is often laid against characters seen as “flat” or “two-dimensional.”

Modern audiences know when a protagonist or supporting character isn’t interesting, based on their own lack of emotional investment in that character’s journey.

Rightfully fearing this criticism, a lot of new authors are compelled to ensure that their protagonist is a dynamic character.

However, as many editors will attest (and as some authors will admit), there is often confusion between “well-written characters” and “dynamic characters” — which are not always one and the same.

In this article, we will take a look at what dynamic characters are, how they differ from static characters, what forms their narratives can take, and how authors can write them into their books.

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What Should Your Characters Talk About? – by K.M. Weiland…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

On Helping Writers Become Authors:

Dialogue is the best part of stories. (Yes, even better than Dickensian narratorial diatribes about crooked politics.)

But it’s tough to write scintillating dialogue when you find yourself asking that fundamental question: “What should your characters talk about?”

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