Tag Archives: novels

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves – 13 Steps to Evil by Sacha Black

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Delighted to welcome a new author to the bookstore today with her new release 13 Steps To Evil: How to Craft Superbad Villains by Sacha Black

About the book

Your hero is not the most important character in your book. Your villain is.

Are you fed up of drowning in two-dimensional villains? Frustrated with creating clichés? And failing to get your reader to root for your villain?

In 13 Steps to Evil, you’ll discover:

+ How to develop a villain’s mindset
+ A step-by-step guide to creating your villain from the ground up
+ Why getting to the core of a villain’s personality is essential to make them credible
+ What pitfalls and clichés to avoid as well as the tropes your story needs

Finally, there is a comprehensive writing guide to help you create superbad villains. Whether you’re just starting out or are a seasoned writer, this book will…

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Smorgasbord book promotion – Air Your Reviews – Robbie and Michael Cheadle and Agnes Mae Graham

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the first of the review posts this week where authors can share their latest recommendations from readers. Check out your Amazon and Goodreads and see if there is a recent one you would like to contribute to be featured in these twice weekly posts.. It will only take a few minutes.  Email me on sally.cronin@moyhill.com

The first review today is my own for Sir Chocolate and the Sugar Dough Bees story and cookbook by Robbie and Michael Cheadle.

About the book

A greedy snail damages the flower fields and the fondant bees are in danger of starving. Join Sir Chocolate on an adventure to find the fruit drop fairies who have magic healing powers and discover how to make some of his favourite foods on the way.

My review for Sir Chocolate and the Sugar Dough Bees story and cookbook.

This book will be a delightful read…

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EDITING 101: 36 – Removing Filter Words…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Removing Filter Words

Filter words are placed between your character and the action. Generally, they are added to a sentence when trying to describe something that your character is experiencing or thinking. While, as usual, there’s a place for them in writing, you can tighten up your scenes immensely when they’re removed. It’s another tidbit for helping you show, rather than tell, as without the filter words, you’re forced to add more description to get what you mean across.

What are some filter words? Felt, realized, saw, wondered, seemed, decided, heard, knew, touched, watched, and can are some of the more common ones. You can search the Internet for other lists of filtering words. Cutting away your filtering words and forcing…

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A plea for reviewers – can we open up a dialogue about self-published books?

Nail Your Novel

So I find a lovely-looking review blog. The posts are thoughtful, fair and seriously considered. I look up the review policy and … it says ‘no self-published books’.

Today I want to open a dialogue with reviewers. If you have that policy, might you be persuaded to change it? Or to approach the problem in a different way?

I used the word ‘problem’. Because I appreciate – very well – that in making this policy you are trying to tackle a major problem. Your time as a reviewer is precious – and let me say your efforts are enormously appreciated by readers and authors alike. You get pitches for many more books than you can read and you need a way to fillet out the ones that are seriously worth your reading hours. A blanket ban is a way to fend off a lot of substandard material and save you…

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EDITING 101: 34 – When to use “which” or “that”?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

When to use “which” or “that”?

This is a grammar conundrum which is specific to the US, and that confused me for quite some time myself. If you’re in the UK or elsewhere that uses UK style, you probably don’t even need to read this post, as it will simply confuse you. Just keep doing what you’re doing and you’ll be fine.

For all you United States writers, heads up and pay attention!

Many people feel “which” and “that” are interchangeable. I used to think so, too, until I did some research and discovered there is indeed a difference. The usage difference stems from whether or not the information following which/that is necessary to the sentence (nonrestrictive) or unnecessary (restrictive). (I…

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Fake News! In Self-Publishing…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

BY

The world has been changed by “fake news” over the past couple of years.

This odd concept came to us from the battlefield of politics, and now it seems that we all have to start learning how to tell the “fake” news from the real thing, the news you can trust.

That’s a big burden to put on the individual, and many will probably just tune out. But the idea of “fake” news can reveal some truths and falsehoods in self-publishing, too.

In fact, it’s undeniable that there’s plenty of “fake” news out there, and although it may not be coming from teenagers in Macedonia, the sooner we learn to spot it, the better off we’ll be.

Here are some examples I’ve come across recently. I bet you’ve got plenty of examples of your own.

Continue reading at the following link:

Fake…

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EDITING 101: 32 – Sentence Length…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Sentence Length

There is no standard sentence length, but it’s still an important factor to consider when revising or editing your manuscript. A sentence can be as short as one word: “What?” On the other end, there are whole books written in one sentence only. Apparently, the current verified world record holder for the longest sentence is Jonathan Coe’s The Rotters Club, published in 2001, contains a sentence with 13,955 words.I don’t recommend this.

According to the blog “Readability Monitor”, “  Based on several studies, press associations in the USA have laid down a readability table. Their survey shows readers find sentences of 8 words or less very easy to read; 11 words, easy; 14 words fairly easy…

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