Tag Archives: writing tips

EDITING 101: 60 – Deleted Material…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Deleted Material

After you’ve finished your first draft, you may decide it is too long and start cutting scenes, and maybe even whole sub-plots. Do you preserve this material, or do you stuff it into the bin without reservation?

Some writers save several (or many!) versions of their work, thereby preserving previous sections. Along that line, some authors email their book to themselves every night. This also guarantees an earlier (or the current) version isn’t lost.

It might be better, though, to place the cut sections into a separate document where you can easily find them. After all, they might fit in beautifully (with a little tweaking) with the next book you write, or in a sequel to the current book!…

View original post 322 more words

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Stranded Novel #amwriting

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

Good first lines are critical. They have a singular duty, to involve the reader and kidnap them for the length of the book.For that reason, first lines and the opening chapters frequently become all that is ever written of a would-be authors novel. Yet the authors of those few chapters have the entire book locked in their head.

Participating in NaNoWriMo teaches authors to write the entire bookbeforethey begin editing.

In your first draft, DON’T OBSESS over the small things and the finer details as these will derail your work.You will never get past the first chapter if all you can focus on is writing a brilliant opener. Write the entire story as quickly as you can, let it sit for a month or two while you do something completely different, THEN come back to it and focus on shaping the prose. Once you…

View original post 615 more words

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Novel plotting 101 – how to get it right

Matthew Wright

Given that National Novel Writing Month is looming up I figured it was worth re-posting this from my archives – how to plot a story. Cue the evil laughter…

How to get a credible story plot and avoid the dumb ones

One of the challenges of NaNoWriMo – or, indeed, of writing any novel – is plotting out a credible story.

Wright_Books2Unless you’re writing comedy – and trust me, comedy is one of the hardest genres to do – it’s far too easy to end up with something that’s too melodramatic, too absurd or just plain dumb.

One of the best examples I’ve ever read where a plot has been made deliberately absurd is Robert A Heinlein’s last ‘juvenile’ novel, Have Spacesuit – Will Travel of 1958. This was a brilliant riff on the sci-fi movies of the day – including what, on the face of it, seemed to be…

View original post 389 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Timely Reminders – Ideas to blog about – Guest Post by, Jemima Pett…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

A timely reminder came into my mail box this morning: The Story Reading Ape’s digest. Among the usual excellent fare (including Monday Funnies, always worth relaxing over with your favourite beverage) was a post on ideas for your next blog post.

My first reaction was – let’s see if I can snag any ideas. My second was – I have too many ideas already, just get on with the things I do.

Of course, the most useful reaction was to take a look and store anything away that might come in useful. It’s a long post. But controlling the tendency to get involved in anything and everything is also a valuable asset. Keep the reason you blog firmly in your mind.

Why do you blog?

It’s a troublesome thing, blogging. Especially if, like me, you blog to have a presence on the web, rather than to make money attracting…

View original post 1,416 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

EDITING 101: 59 – Character Profiles…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Character Profiles

Whether you’re a plotter or a pantser (101:21), I’m almost 100% certain that at some point, you’ll have to keep track of your characters’ details. The plotter/pantser post also covered some practical ways that some authors make sure these details are fresh in their minds—or, at least, quickly available.

However, before you can list these precious tidbits of information, you have to either discover them (if your story leads you) or decide on them (if you lead your story). The obvious information is focused on physical appearance: eye color, hair color, stature, body shape, etc. But sometimes authors neglect to round out their profiles with other information that can play a critical part in your story. I’m talking about…

View original post 491 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

How to Write a Sassy, Snarky, Sizzling Author Resource Box…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By 

Image from: Bigstock

Some people collect antique china. Others keep a stash of comic books from their childhood.

I collect author resources boxes.

Why? Because the ones most authors write are more potent than Ambien. And every time I see one that makes me smile, I grab a screenshot for safekeeping.

A resource box is the super-short bio, usually 50 to 100 words, at the end of articles and guest blog you’ve written. Sometimes they include a link to a website. Sometimes they’re only one sentence. That means you must make the best use of every character in a tiny amount of real estate.

Why so short? Because if you’re writing a guest blog post or an article for a magazine, the blogger and magazine editor each have their own “rules” on how short it must be. If you’re not sure, ask!

View original post 38 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

EDITING 101: 58 – Showing Character Emotion…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Showing Character Emotion

Leilani was frightened.

Austin looked about nervously.

Willow’s face was drawn into an angry scowl.

(insert unhappy readers’ dramatic sighs here)

In the classic struggle to “show” rather than “tell,” emotions are an easy place to fall into “telling,” as each of the statements above demonstrate.

How do you show your readers what your characters are feeling? In some respects, you need to become a serious student of human nature. What kinds of body language tell you when your partner is angry, when your child is lying, when your co-worker is uncertain, or when your boss is about to get demanding? A slight tic next to the eye, a hand clenching repeatedly at one’s side, an emotionless face…

View original post 380 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized