Tag Archives: writing tips

Real Writers Never Write Anything In All Small Letters – by Derek Haines…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

youre not a writer if you write in all small letters

i get a lot of emails and messages from writers and authors

i also get book submissions along with book descriptions

but i get so annoyed when i get them written in all lower case letters with little or no punctuation

its not only lazy its impolite

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How to Intertwine Plot, Character, and Theme in Every Scene – by K.M. Weiland…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Helping Writers Become Authors:

If plot, character, and theme are the foundational underpinnings of story itself, then they must be present in every scene as well, right?

But that gets tricky.

How can you make surethese elements are doing their job in every scene?

And if they’re not present in every scene, does that necessarily mean the scene is problematic?

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15 Ways to Make Your Characters Suffer (for the Good of Your Novel) – by Ali Luke…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Aliventures site:

Do your characters suffer enough?

Even if you’re writing a light and fluffy romance, at some point, someone in your novel is going to need to get hurt.

I’m not suggesting all-out graphic torture here, obviously – unless that suits your genre. Suffering comes in a lot of different forms – and I’m going to go through a bunch of those in a moment.

In general, making characters suffer should do at least one, ideally both, of these:

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Thoughts on revisions and self-editing #amwriting

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

New and beginning authors often (loudly) assert their ability to edit their own work. If you are “editing” your own manuscript, you have a fool for a client. There is no such thing as self-editing—the best you can do is make revisions and admire your work. For that reason, we need other eyes on our work.

As authors, we see what we intended to write rather than what was written. We misread clumsy sentences and overlook words that are missing or are included twice in a row.  If you are in a critique group, you have a great resource in your fellow authors—they will spot things you have overlooked your work just as you do in theirs.

The first draft of any manuscript is the story as it flowed out of your mind and onto the paper. Yes, there is life and energy in your words, but your manuscript is not publishable at…

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Dynamic Character: How to write a compelling protagonist – from Reedsy…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

A common criticism of fiction — be it in film, television, or novels — is often laid against characters seen as “flat” or “two-dimensional.”

Modern audiences know when a protagonist or supporting character isn’t interesting, based on their own lack of emotional investment in that character’s journey.

Rightfully fearing this criticism, a lot of new authors are compelled to ensure that their protagonist is a dynamic character.

However, as many editors will attest (and as some authors will admit), there is often confusion between “well-written characters” and “dynamic characters” — which are not always one and the same.

In this article, we will take a look at what dynamic characters are, how they differ from static characters, what forms their narratives can take, and how authors can write them into their books.

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Five tips for writing good prose

Nail Your Novel

How do we learn to write good prose? Indeed, what is it? How do we develop our use of language, play our literary instrument with more elan and flair?

We were probably all encouraged at school to use difficult words instead of simple ones. I see plenty of work that still seems in thrall to that, thinking that ‘printable writing’ must mean to use the thesaurus as often as possible.

Now I’ll happily use a thesaurus to find the bon mot that’s slipped my mind. But we’ve all seen writing that waxes far too lyrical, looks self-conscious and overdone.

The other huge sin is tortuous obfuscation, as if the writer is trying to prove they are clever. Just for a giggle, look at this example in The Philosophy and Literature Bad Writing Contest. Here’s a taster:

If, for a while, the ruse of desire is calculable for the uses…

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Editing Tip: Common Consistency Errors You Might Be Making

A Writer's Path

by Emily Nemchick

When you check your own manuscript for errors, you are probably looking for misspelled words, dodgy grammar, and the inevitable typos. Those are all things you need to correct—but you should also be aware of pesky consistency errors that are commonplace in poorly edited manuscripts.

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