How to Re-Blog without a Re-blog Button | Self Publishing on a Budget

via How to Re-Blog without a Re-blog Button | Self Publishing on a Budget


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7 Tips to Being Dramatic . . . In Fiction

Legends of Windemere

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Adding drama into your writing can be tough and many are leery about adding this due it skewing toward the negative.  Yet, it’s fairly unavoidable if you sit down and consider what can be born from it.  We may even add it without realizing what we’re doing.  There are days I think we all have different views and definitions of drama.  Some people consider it a genre while others call it a literary tool.  So, are there any tips that can cross every genre and be seen as universal?

  1. Drama tends to be seen as highly emotional, which means it can be the cornerstone of conflict.  When a person or character goes through change, they have emotions that guide them just as much as thoughts.  This is part of their growth, so we have to consider this in our writing.  Without this type of drama, the characters…

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Do Your Characters Talk too Much? When to Use Indirect Dialogue…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Anne R. Allen

I’ve been looking over some of my much-rejected early work and discovered my old stories have way too much dialogue. This is something I see in a lot of newbie fiction.

I remember a guy who came into the bookstore where I worked in the mid-1990’s, schlepping a huge carton of copies of his self-published novel. We agreed to give him a read, but I couldn’t get past chapter six. By then I still had no idea what the novel was about. Four guys were sitting in various places talking about relationships and politics. The book was nothing but dialogue. It read like a script that didn’t even have stage directions.

His characters needed to shut up already and get on with the story. If there was one. So did mine.

And yet, in all the standard how-to-write books, we’re urged to write: “More scenes! More…

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The time has come…

Have We Had Help?


…to end the ridiculous professional versus amateur writer argument!!

For a few days several months ago various highly inflammatory articles appeared across the internet voicing differing opinions regarding independent writers, claiming that they were not professional in their approach – whatever that is supposed to mean.

Certain commentators delivered vitriolic attacks accusing independent writers of being nothing more than an editor’s worst nightmare and a monumental pain to deal with. When they were quite rightly challenged for making such statements, they immediately went on the offensive, under the illusion that attack is always the best form of defence when you’ve been caught out! By reacting in the way they did, they instantly lost the argument. Apart from venting their spleen, what was the point? I suspected when I read the articles at the time that the attackers were probably jealous of the sales success of some independent writers. Of course…

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The One Thing That Will Kill Book Sales Dead—And 10 Ways to Avoid it…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Anne R. Allen

I never have as much time to read as I think I will, and my trusty old Kindle is pretty loaded up. So I’m a picky book-buyer. Unfortunately, there are a lot of readers like me out here, and you don’t want to lose us.

I’m often intrigued by a book’s cover and blurb, and sometimes a glowing review on Facebook or a book blog will send me to a buy page.

But I never buy without checking out the “LOOK INSIDE!” On most retail sites, that’s 10% of the book—which anybody can read free.

That  “LOOK INSIDE” freebie is your most important book sales tool.

Make sure it’s going to snag readers, not kill book sales just as you’re about to close the deal.

With many books—not only self-published, but trad-pubbed as well—the first few pages will stop the sale for me.

I admit my…

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How To Describe Characters Without Infodumping

The Uncensored Writer

I sent out a Newsletter the other day telling you guys that I’m open for questions! I said I would answer your writing-related questions in dedicated posts of their own if possible.

This is the first one of those posts!

This question comes from Dheep Matharu:

“How do you tackle introducing new characters and describing their physical appearance without infodumping.  Often, with my work, I feel it interrupts the flow, when the rest of the book is intended to be not particularly descriptive.”

This is probably one of the toughest problems out there.

You have this picture in your head of your protagonist; from what they look like to all their mannerisms. A well-made protagonist will be a character that instantly draws you into the story. So of course, you want to fill the pages with all the details of that character in order for your reader to feel it…

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#Writerlife101 Day 7: Worst writing advice #amwriting

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

Writing advice is good because beginning authors need to learn the craft, and simple sayings are easy to remember. They encourage us to write lean, descriptive prose and craft engaging conversations. The craft of writing involves learning the rules of grammar, developing a wider vocabulary, learning how to develop characters, build worlds, etc., etc. Authors spend a lifetime learning their craft and never learn all there is to know about the subject.

Writing advice is bad because it is so frequently taken to extremes by novice authors armed with a little dangerous knowledge.

  • Remove all adverbs.
    This advice is complete crap. Use common sense and don’t use unnecessary adverbs.
  • Don’t use speech tags.
    What? Who said that and why are there no speech tags in this drivel?
  • Show, Don’t Tell. Don’t Ever Don’t do it!

Quote from Susan Defreitas for Lit Reactor: Sure, hot tears, a pounding pulse, and clenched…

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